What happens when a Foundry loses its mind

At a previous company we had a large number of Foundry Networks layer-3 switches. They participated in our OSPF network and had a really annoying bug. Every now and then one of them would get somewhat confused and would corrupt its OSPF database (there seemed to be some pointer that would end up off by one). It would then cleverly realize that its LSDB was different to everyone else's and so would flood this corrupt database to all other OSPF speakers. Some vendors would do a better job of sanity checking the LSAs and would ignore the bad LSAs, other vendors would install them -- now you have different link state databases on different devices and OSPF becomes unhappy.

Nov 24 22:23:53.633 EST: %OSPF-4-BADLSAMASK: Bad LSA mask: Type 5, LSID 0.9.32.5 
Mask 10.160.8.0 from 10.178.255.252 
NOTE: This route will not be installed in the routing table.
Nov 26 11:01:32.997 EST: %OSPF-4-BADLSAMASK: Bad LSA mask: Type 5, LSID 0.4.2.3
Mask 10.2.153.0 from 10.178.255.252 
NOTE: This route will not be installed in the routing table.
Nov 27 23:14:00.660 EST: %OSPF-4-BADLSAMASK: Bad LSA mask: Type 5, LSID 0.4.2.3
Mask 10.2.153.0 from 10.178.255.252 
NOTE: This route will not be installed in the routing table.


 If you look at the output, you can see that there is some garbage in the LSID field and the bit that should be there is now in the Mask section. I also saw some more extreme version of the same bug, in my favorite example the mask was 115.104.111.119 and further down there was 105.110.116.114 -- if you take these as decimal number and look up thier ASCII values we get "show" and "inte" -- I wrote a tool to scrape bits from these errors and ended up with a large amount of the CLI help text.